Shortcuts to Get Out of Sandbox in Search Engine Optimization SEO

Are there any shortcuts in SEO? Does it really need to take more than 3 months to get out of Google sandbox for new domains? Still there are a lot people arguing if there is a Sandbox. The answer would depend on the definition of what 'sandbox' means. If a 'sandbox' means the un-favorable situation which a new website would rank for competitive keywords, then 'sandbox' really exists.

In my SEO experience, a new website would not rank very well in its first level keywords. How does Google decide what are the first level keywords in a website? Google has a very smart calculation for this. If the keyword phrases are in your title tap, and also in your headline or even in your bold text, you are almost guaranteed Google would find out what your first level keyword phrases are. If you have some valuable links, you would probably rank well in your second level keyword phrases, but not the keywords you most desire. About half month after your first PageRank update, your ranking of your first level keyword phrases would gradually increase. And about another half month, the true value of your ranking positions in all keyword phrases would show. This process would take about 4 months in total. That's right! 3 month to wait for the first PageRank update, another month for graduate rankings increase.

That comes to the question-is there any shortcut to the sandbox situation? Yes, many people have tried, and it works. Go to some auction sites and buy an old domain name, the older the better. You have to be very careful that this old domain you are buying is not a banned site. If the domain has a PageRank which would be safe to buy. If the content of this old domain was doing something near your new website topic would be even better. Then, you 301 redirect the old website to your new website. About 3 weeks later, you are ranking as if you are a trusted old website. If you wonder how to do the 301 redirect, you can search for '301 redirect code', people teach you all that.

3 weeks compare to 4 months in the Sandbox is an amazing deal. If you are still thinking 3 weeks is a little too long, then you may build your website directly in this old domain. The disadvantage is that the old domain name may not be your favor. And the existing backlinks of this old domain may somehow look strange to Google because of the un-relevant contents and anchor text of the link page. You may be thinking-is it that same if I '301 redirect' the old domain to your new website? The backlinks of the old domain is still not relevant. Would it harm my new website? No, because the action of '301 redirect' is made in the old domain. Your new website does not need to do anything with this action. Remember Google in its official page saying that never hurts you!

If you still worry, you might think in this way: imagine if there is a competitor who would like to pull you down from the ranking, then your competitor '301 redirect' a web page with illegal content to your website. Do you think you would really be pull down? If this '301 redirect' would anyhow harm you, a lot of sites would not exist in this moment. '301 redirect' should not harm you anyhow.

Hiking Boots – Parts And Construction

When shopping for a pair of hiking boots, it is important to know how they are made. No, you do not need to know how to make your own, but you have to understand what goes into them and how it affects the comfort and durability – the overall quality – of the hiking boots. In this article I will describe the parts of a hiking boot, what they are made of, and how they come together to form the ideal hiking boot for you.

Like any shoe, a hiking boot consists of an upper and a sole joined together by a welt and with an inlet at the front covered by a tongue, and the whole is lined with various pads and cushions. I will discuss each of those parts in detail, in terms of what they are made of and what to look for in various types of hiking boots.

Sole and Welt

Let's start at the bottom. The soul of the hiking boot is the sole.

Soles are usually made of synthetic rubber in varying degrees of hardness. A harder sole will last longer, but generally will have poorer Traction on hard surfaces (such as bare rock) and will provide less cushioning. A softer sole gives you the cushioning you need for long hikes and the transaction you need on rough ground, but it will wear out faster.

Manufacturers have made their trade-offs in choosing the materials to make their boots out of. The final choice is up to you when you choose which boot to buy. If you expect to do most of your hiking on soft surfaces, such as desert sand or bare soil, you might lean more towards harder soles. But most of us hike on fairly rugged trails with a good deal of bare rock, and we need the traction of a softer sole.

Inside the sole is a shank. It is a stiffening structure, either fiberglass or steel, that prevails the sole of the boot from twisting and that provides arch support. Shanks may be only three-quarter or half-length. Hiking shoes generally have no shank at all, deriving all their stiffness from the molded rubber sole. Good day-hiking boots may have a full-length fiberglass shank. High-quality backpacking boots will give you the choice of fiberglass or steel. It will depend on how strong you need your hiking boots to be, and how heavy.

Look for deep, knobby tread. Deep cuts in the sole allow water and mud to flow out so you can get traction. "Fake" hiking boots, designed to look like hiking boots but not to perform like them, may have thinner soles and shallow tread. Working boots also may have shallow tread, and they generally have harder soles than hiking boots have.

The welt is the connection between the sole and the upper. Virtually all hiking boots these days are glued together rather than sewn. If you are buying a very expensive pair of backpacking boots, give preference to a sewn welt. Boots with a sewn welt will be easier to resole when the original sole wears out. For hiking shoes or day-hiking boots, when the sole wears out, the upper is not worth salvaging, either, so a glued welt is just fine.

Upper

The upper of the hiking boot brings warmth, protects the sides of your feet from rocks and brush, and repels water. It must also allow your feet to "breathe," so that moisture from perspiration will not build up inside the boots and cause blisters.

Uppers of hiking boots are usually at least partially made of leather. High-quality backpacking boots are often made of full-grain leather (leather that has not been split). Lighter boots may be made of split-grain leather (leather that has been split or sued on one side), or a combination of split-grain leather with various fabrics.

Fabrics that are combined with leather are usually some type of nylon. Heavy nylon wears almost as well as leather, and it is much lighter and cheaper than leather.

In any hiking boot, especially those made of combinations of leather and fabric, there will be seams. Seams are bad. Seams are points of failure. Seams are points of wear, as one panel of the boot rubs against another. Seams are penetrations that are difficult to waterproof.

The uppers of backpacking boots are sometimes made of a single piece of full-grain leather with only one seam at the back. This is good, for all the reasons that seams are bad, but it is expensive.

You're going to have to deal with seams. But as you shop for hiking boots, look for customer reviews that mention failure or undue wearing of the seams, and avoid those brands.

Inlet and Tongue

There are two things to look for in the inlet and the tongue:

1. How the laces are attached and adjusted

2. How the tongue is attached to the sides of the inlet

The inlet may be provided with eyelets, D-rings, hooks, and webbing, alone or in combination. They each have these advantages and disadvantages:

* Eyelets: Simplest and most durable way to lace a boot. Not so easily adjusted.

* D-rings: Easier to adjust than eyelets, more durable than hooks. More failure-prone than eyelets. (They can break, and they can tear out of the leather.)

* Hooks: Easiest to adjust of all lace attachments. Subject to getting hooked on brush, or bent or broken in impacts with boulders, main cause of breakage of laces.

* Webbing: Cause less chafing of laces, slightly easier to adjust than eyelets, slightly more durable than D-rings. More failure-prone than eyelets.

The most common lace attachment of any hiking boot is eyelets below ankle-level and hooks above. You may see eyelets all the way up, as in classic military-style combat boots, or a combination of either D-rings or webbing with hooks.

The attachment of the tongue is a critical factor in how waterproof the hiking boots are. Provided the leather and / or fabric and seams of the upper are waterproof, water will not get into the boots until it gets higher than the attachment point of the tongue.

Most hiking shoes and day-hiking boots have the tongue attached all the way to the top. If the tongue is not fully attached, consider carefully wherever you will need that extra inch or two of waterproofing.

High-rise backpacking boots have the tongue attached only partway up, but that still reaches higher than most day-hiking boots. It's difficult to get the boot on and off if the tongue is attached very high.

Linings and Pads

There are many pieces that go into the lining and padding of a hiking boot, but two in particular you need to pay attention to:

1. The sole lining

2. The scree collar

The sole lining must be appropriately cushioned. You want a firm, durable surface in immediate contact with your socks, but enough cushioning below that to absorb impact.

The scree collar is a cushion around the top of most hiking boots. It enables you to pull the boots tight enough to keep out loose rocks ("scree") but without chafing against your ankle and Achilles tendon. This is the thickest and softest cushion in the whole hiking boot. It must be soft enough to conform to your ankle and Achilles tendon as they move, and still keep close enough contact with your leg to keep the rocks out.

Very high hiking boots, such as military-style combat boots, may have no scree collar at all. The height of the boot is what keeps the rocks out.

Throughout, the lining and padding of the hiking boots must be thick enough to provide warm, durable enough to last, and smooth enough that it will not cause chafing and blisters.

Conclusion

So, these are the things you need to pay attention to when going a pair of hiking boots. Be prepared to compromise, and pay attention to which features are really important to the style of hiking you intend to do.

No Credit? Here Are Easy Ways You Can Build Credit

Are you someone who has not established credit yet? Are you denied the same access to credit cards, loans and other credit ways simply because your credit score is too low from not having enough credit or no credit at all. Do not fret, because help is on the way!

If you are planning on getting a personal loan, owning a car, having a home of your own, working in a bank or finally acquiring the furniture you've been longing for a long time then establishing a credit is the answer.

Here are a few ways you can start building up your credit report and get on the road to good credit!

– Start to apply for a guaranteed approval credit card that reports to the credit bureaus. Take your time and always read the fine print in order for you to find the best deal for yourself. These cards are similar to debit cards but they have the Visa or Mastercard logo on them and they report to the credit bureaus.

– Another option might be to check if the lending institution of your choice has a secured credit card being offered. The interest may be higher but you may be able to upgrade to an unsecured card within 12 months if you maintain your payments on time.

– Another type of credit card with easy approval requirements is the merchandise credit cards and department store credit cards. These are an excellent source to start to establish a line of credit. Make sure it's a store where you can purchase a lot of your shopping needs. This way, you do not need to apply for a multiple cards at once which can be seen as a negative on your credit report. One word of caution. Department store credit cards tend to have high interest rates, many of their interest rates start at 15%. So keep an eye on your balance and try to pay as much as you can each month. NEVER make just the minimum payment, especially on a department store credit card.

– Do not forget to fill up any application for a loan or credit card completely. If something does not apply put N / A on that line. Including your checking and savings accounts and any accounts you pay for on a monthly basis even if they do not appear on your credit report. If they do not appear on your credit report, please make sure you include a way for your prospective lender to contact them for a trade reference.

If you are thinking about applying for a car loan, it's good to do research on the dealership or car lot where you want to make the purchase. Most dealers will provide a source of financing. Some may carry their own loan and payment plans. Be on the lookout though and read contract carefully if you do not want to get stuck with an interest rate that is through the roof. This venture is where a good cosigner may come into play.

Use these tips to help jumpstart your credit history and get approved for the credit that you deserve!

Copyright (c) 2006 Liz Roberts

Mesh Motorcycle Jackets

Mesh motorcycle jackets have been gaining in popularity over the years. Leather jackets very often fail to provide relief during very hot summer rides. Mesh jackets make our rides pleasant and comfortable. Such jackets allow for greater circulation of air which makes them more suitable for wearing in hot weather.

Mesh jackets typically have thicker fibers with an 'open weave'. This enables the free movement of air inside the jacket. Such jackets are a blessing in warm weather.

Different types of mesh jackets are available today. Hundreds of companies make excellent-quality jackets for men and women.

Brands like AGV, Vanson, Tecknic, Olympia, Joe Rocket, First Gear, Tour Master, Icon, Alpinestars and Fieldsheer are popular among motorcyclists. They provide high-quality mesh jackets.

Besides providing relief during summer, such jackets also offer maximum protection. Usually all brands offer a combination of armor as well as foam padding and patches in shoulders, elbows, and other high-impact places.

Some popular mesh motorcycle jackets include the AGV sport aeromesh jacket ($ 139), Vanson vent jacket ($ 199), Tecknic supervent jacket ($ 130) and many others. AGV jackets also have reflective badges, which are extremely useful at night.

The 'First Gear mesh-tex jacket' is highly popular and available in different sizes and colors. Fieldsheer mesh jackets also are high quality, ultra-breathable and abrasion-resistant, and available in different colors.

An unusual mesh motorcycle jacket is offered by Race ATV. Incorporating an electrical lead into a harness fitted with a motorcycle's rear lights, it provides a 'graphic window' on the back of the jacket, which emits light when using brakes or turn signals.

Companies like Motorcycle Style, Sport Tour, Race ATV, ABA's Leather Jackets, Amazon, Brockton Cycle Center, Motorcycle Superstore and many others offer high-quality mesh jackets. Free shipping is offered by companies such as Sport Tour. With cooling effects, padding and armor, such jackets combine comfort and protection. An absolute necessity during warm weather, they should certainly be part of any motorcyclists' riding gear collection.